Development of over 8,000 Lakeview Village units approved by Mississauga planning committee

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A residential and commercial development project of more than 8,000 units near the Mississauga waterfront has been approved by the city’s planning committee.
  • Lakeview Community Partners agreed that at least five percent of housing units in the development would be affordable, which would represent about 400 units, half of the more than 800 that planners in Mississauga have requested.

A residential and commercial development project of more than 8,000 units near the Mississauga waterfront has been approved by the city’s planning committee.

The Lakeview Village development of Lakeview Community Partners Limited on 71.6 hectares at 1082 Lakeshore Rd. E. and 800 Hydro Road. was approved by the Mississauga planning committee on Monday, November 8, with city staff recommending that the sprawling project go ahead with a few suspensions to address outstanding issues.

Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie told the meeting that she was “incredibly proud” of the project and that it was the result of years of community consultations to cover up and use the former 177-acre coal-fired power plant. from Ontario Power Generation.

“It was a powerhouse not that long ago and now we’re going to have a great mixed-use community,” she said.

The local resident group Lakeview Ratepayers Association (LRA) has raised concerns about the height of buildings in the southern part of the project’s waterfront, specifically calling for a proposed 24-story tower at the southern corner. -west of the development be lowered to 12 stories.

In an Oct. 15 report, planning staff said they were satisfied that the 24-story tower could be “set back enough from the waterfront to avoid unacceptable compatibility impacts.”

LRA President Deborah Goss said it was still possible to lower the height of the tower through an upcoming design competition.

“From our perspective, there is still work to be done, but it will be done based on more creative things,” she said, such as the creation of an Aboriginal cultural center in Lakeview Village.

Blockages will be placed on the development to address project-related issues related to “noise, odors and traffic capacity,” according to a report from city staff.

A planned 1.5 million square foot “innovation district” in Lakeview Village will stand at 1 million square feet until the express bus lanes are completed on Lakeshore Road East, which is slated for 2027 .

The innovation district will be different from a more conventional business park, according to Brian Sutherland of Argo Development Corporation, one of the Lakeview Community Partners companies.

He said the goal was to “fully integrate” the innovation district with a planned retail market, as well as the parks and cultural buildings of Lakeview Village, “so it’s not just a autonomous business park or office development ”.

“And I think that’s the overwhelming vision and goal we have here.”

But how will the important business aspects of Lakeview Village’s tariff post COVID-19, when many workplaces allow working from home and online sales will continue to compete with brick and mortar retail?

Professor William Strange of the Rotman School of Business studies commercial real estate in major cities before and after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

He said that during COVID-19, there had been a “weakening of attachment” to downtown areas, potentially to the benefit of more suburban cities like Mississauga.

“It’s places like Mississauga that would be the beneficiaries of people moving out of downtown Toronto, as it has for decades,” Strange said. “And so in that regard, while post-COVID commercial real estate certainly has more than its share of risks, suburban commercial real estate might be able to overcome the challenges of COVID better than downtown real estate. “

The outstanding odor issue is with the GE Booth Wastewater Treatment Plant in Peel Region, which is on the eastern end of the development. According to city staff, interim measures to mitigate odors from the plant are in place, but part of the development will still be subject to “adverse odor conditions” until 2027.

The development of 8,050 residential units represents 1,701 units less than the 9,751 offered by Lakeview Community Partners in 2019.

Lakeview Community Partners agreed that at least five percent of housing units in the development would be affordable, which would represent about 400 units, half of the more than 800 that planners in Mississauga have requested.

The affordable housing minimum is part of more than 46 “conditions of approval” for the development, including the inclusion of a maximum of 150 purpose-built rental units.

Update – November 8, 2021: Updated story with more development info, commentary from Bonnie Crombie, Deborah Goss, Brian Sutherland, and William Strange.


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