Kyotography 2021 | Cultural | Japan metropolis

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Kyotography, one of Japan’s biggest art and photography festivals of the year, returns to the city from September 18 to October 17, showcasing another selection of international creative excellence. “For the 9th edition,” said Lucille Reyboz and Yusuke Nakanishi, co-founders and directors of the event, “we invite artists using a variety of mediums to share their intimate thoughts. This year’s theme, “Echo,” offers artists and viewers a lens through which to examine the echoes and ripples of memories and events in their own lives, as well as collectively. Globally, we have united the continued impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and Japan is also living 2021 as the 10th anniversary of the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in 2011. Along with works of art stand blending into the architecture and space of the city, temples, castles and ancient buildings, the theme is even more appropriate. Echoes of Kyoto’s ancient past harmonize with modern creation. Below are some of the highlights from this year’s artist lineup.

Thomas Dhellemmes and Yuna Yagi collaborate at Ryosokuin temple (Kennin-ji temple) with “Legumineux” and “The Record of Seeds”

Yuna Yagi Temple “The Record of Seeds” Ryosokuin (Kennin-ji Temple) is printed on a traditional Japanese hanging scroll to blend in with the temple environment.

Yuna Yagi “The Seed File” Ryosokuin Temple (Kennin-ji Temple). Located in the Rinchi-tei Tea Room next to the traditional gardens of Ryosokuin Temple, this work documents the preserved seeds of native plant species using a technique called cyanotype.

Erwin Olaf “Annus Mirabilis” in the annex of the Kyoto museum

Erwin Olaf “April Fools” Annex of the Kyoto Museum.
Half of Olaf’s “Annus Mirabilis” exhibit, “April Fool,” documents how the COVID 19 pandemic has highlighted our dependence on capitalist structures.

“April Fools” in the annex of the Kyoto museum.

Olaf’s “Im Wald” is the second half of Olaf’s “Annus Mirabilis” exhibition, contrasting the relative insignificance of man with the sublime beauty of nature.

Erwin Olaf “Im Wald” The annex of the Kyoto museum.

Ngadi Smart “collector” ftiger lying copenhagen Kyoto Kawaramachi Store 3F

Ngadi Smart “The faces of Abissa” Flying tiger copenhagen Kyoto Kawaramachi Store 3F.
Ngadi Smart’s “Manifold” is made up of four parts. “The Faces of Abissa” presents the Abissa tradition of the N’zime people of southeastern Côte d’Ivoire and southwestern Ghana.

Ngadi Smart “The queens of Babi” Flying tiger copenhagen Kyoto Kawaramachi Store 3F.
The second part of Smart’s “Manifold” exhibition, “Les reines de Babi”, focuses on the Abidjan drag community, Ivory Coast.

Ngadi Smart “The faces of Abissa” Flying tiger copenhagen Kyoto Kawaramachi Store 3F.
This exhibit is designed to resemble a womb, using organic materials to reflect the atmosphere of Africa. Viewers experience the exhibition by walking gradually in a spiral movement from the outside to the center of the drawing.

Yingfei Liang “Under the scars” Sfera

Yingfei Liang “Under the scars” Sfera.
Liang is an emerging Chinese photojournalist and winner of last year’s KG + Select satellite event.

Yingfei Liang “Under the scars” Sfera.
This exhibition consists of six series of photos linked to memories of sexual assaults by victims known to the artist.

Yingfei Liang “Under the scars, a locked room 2” Sfera.
Each series of photos attempts to reconstruct elements engraved in the memory of the victim. The space is designed in separate compartments with frosted walls to reflect the confusion and ambiguity of the trauma.

RongRong and inri “Jifei Kyoto” Outdoor area of ​​the Lake Biwa Canal Museum

RongRong & inri “Jifei Kyoto” Outdoor area of ​​the Lake Biwa Canal Museum.
RongRong & inri are a married couple who have worked together for 20 years. This exhibition is inspired by their mission to get back to basics with their art.

RongRong & inri “Jifei Kyoto” Outdoor area of ​​the Lake Biwa Canal Museum.
The series focuses on the basic organic elements of nature, with the natural space of Lake Biwa being an integral part of the exhibition.

RongRong & inri “Jifei Kyoto” Outdoor area of ​​the Drum Factory at the Lake Biwa Canal Museum.
From the outside to the 130-year-old Drum Factory, images of everyday life mingled with nature are projected onto cloud-like surfaces.

RongRong & inri “Jifei Kyoto” Outdoor area of ​​the Drum Factory at the Lake Biwa Canal Museum.
This series is inspired by the underground water table under Kyoto and its contribution to life and existence in the city.

RongRong & inri “Jifei Kyoto” Outdoor area of ​​the Drum Factory of the Lake Biwa Canal Museum

Women artists of Studio MEP: New perspectives of cinema and photography in France HOSOO GALLERY

Marguerite Bornhauser “Red Harvest” GALERIE HOSOO.
This exhibition presents five young women artists from France, selected by the MEP in Paris.

Marguerite Bornhauser “Red Harvest” GALERIE HOSOO.
Each of the four works in this exhibition features French women artists at the forefront of various photographic disciplines. Marguerite Bornhauser is known for her strong use of saturated colors.

Marguerite Bornhauser “Red Harvest, Untitled” GALERIE HOSOO

To see all the artists and their work, visit the Kyotographie festival:

Kyotography 2021
September 18 – October 17
kyotography.jp

Elsewhere on Metropolis:

Why the world needs literature

Kengo KumaKengo Kuma: skyscrapers are going out of fashion

BAHK and SHART: Gen Z Graffiti Artists from Tokyo


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