Ten student design projects from the Hong Kong Design Institute

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A fashion collection inspired by 1970s clubbing culture and a project that imagines humans with shellfish exoskeletons are included in Dezeen’s latest school show by students at the Hong Kong Design Institute.


Among the projects presented are also a self-care tool that aims to strengthen the immune system of young people and a project that explores the use of caves to combat land scarcity in Hong Kong.


School: Hong Kong Institute of Design

School statement:

Hong Kong Institute of Design (HKDI) was established in 2007 with a mission to be a leading provider of design education and lifelong learning in various design disciplines including architecture, interior and product design, design communication, digital media and fashion and image design.

“With ‘creativity in action’ as the cornerstone of its pedagogy, HKDI maintains a strong network with the creative industries. This provides students with essential hands-on experience and with the international design academia to provide extended learning opportunities for students through international exchanges, joint workshops and conferences.

“Each year, HKDI trains the largest number of professional designers in Hong Kong with critical thinking, cultural sensitivity, social responsibility and an international outlook.”


Trappist Retreat Center by Sinji Lau

“This project aims to revitalize an abandoned and devastated Trappist dairy farm for more than 30 years.

“The new Trappist retreat center is not only a museum with exhibits, it also offers a place of experience and memory for visitors to understand the history of the site as a monastery. It provides a place to relax amidst their bustling urban lifestyle.

Student: Sinji lau
Classes: HD in Architectural Design, BA (Hons) Architecture
E-mail: [email protected]


Hong Kong Institute of Design

Parallel City – HKDI Exhibition at the Venice Biennale by Ben Chen, Brian Leung, Samson Li, Edison Eg, Johnson Wan and Cho Ting Wong

“Land supply has been a long-standing challenge for Hong Kong. This project explores the possibility of living in a cave to cope with scarcity. Here the cave is separated into four layers: community service, residential, unspoiled natural landscape, and vertical utility layer.

“The basic requirements of life such as ventilation, light, electricity, water are provided by“ columns of life. ”The city’s main transport network runs through the site, which suits the pace fast life of Hong Kong. “

Student: Ben Chen, Brian Leung, Samson Li, Edison Eg, Johnson Wan and Cho Ting Wong
Classes: HD in Architectural Design, BA (Hons) Architecture
E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected] and [email protected]


Hong Kong Institute of Design

Nirvana Bookstore by Kelly Tsang

“The needs of the visually impaired are always overlooked by society. The inclusive design of the Nirvana Bookstore meets the needs of the visually impaired and visually impaired.

“It requires users to perceive the library with different senses through the use of textured, multisensory, accessibility, holistic design, and spatial layout surfaces.”

Student: Kelly tsang
Classes: HD in interior design
E-mail: [email protected]


Hong Kong Design Institute

All is well by Elektra Liu

“This is a caring, fun project that provides an easy self-help tool to help young adults navigate stressful situations digitally and physically.

“This project aims to improve well-being during the pandemic – to enable users to stay physically, mentally and emotionally well, reduce stress, improve immune systems, increase productivity and increase self esteem.”

Student: Elektra Liu
Classes: BA (Hons) in Graphic Design
E-mail:
[email protected]


Hong Kong Institute of Design

Life Form by Sing Chung

“Compared to other animal species, humans have more advanced cognitive abilities but a limited physiological ability to adapt to conditions of extreme heat and cold. In comparison, other animals adapt more quickly to survive and save in the natural environment.

“This project draws on the biological characteristics of crustaceans – their hard exoskeletons and the diurnal changes in their environment. It imagines humans possessing these characteristics, acquiring the ability to adapt to extreme environments.”

Student: Sing Chung
Classes:
HD in fashion image design
E-mail:
[email protected]


Hong Kong Institute of Design

Follower obsessed with Rainie Wong

“Baroque and 1970s clubbing culture features the use of exaggerated movements producing drama, exuberance and grandeur in sculpture, painting, architecture, dance and music.

“Their stories inspired the development of Obsessed Disciple – an overly ornate, theatrical and extravagant fashion collection with intricate embroidered designs, luxurious materials, jewelry-like embellishments and accessories.”

Student: Rainie wong
Classes:
HD in fashion image design
E-mail:
[email protected]


Hong Kong Institute of Design

Belide’s World by Lok Him Wan

“This is a collaborative project with international fashion brand Max & Co. The results of the project include a series of fashion images, a film and a social media strategy.

“Belide’s World is inspired by a surreal, fantastic and bizarre world, with extraordinary characters and wonderful tea parties. This project conveys playfulness, curiosity, fantasy and mystery, while motivating people to liberate their creativity in every way possible. “

Student: Lok Lui Wan
Classes:
HD in branding and fashion shopping
E-mail:
[email protected]


Hong Kong Institute of Design

Musubi by Pui Yee Chan

“Musubi is made using traditional techniques such as bundling, weaving and entangling that are layered into modern clothing and then adorned with conventional patterns from Japanese culture.

“With cords tying different garments together in one outfit, her silhouette harmoniously combines ancient and modern forms with a twist to remind viewers that there is always beauty in the details if they learn to look closely enough. . “

Student: Pui Yee Chan
Classes:
HD in fashion design
E-mail:
[email protected]


Hong Kong Design Institute

I am beautiful by Charice Lai

“This is another kind of beauty aesthetic on non-binary / gender fluids / genres / androgynous people. Hong Kong does not have gender recognition legislation against discrimination based on orientation. sexuality, gender identity, gender expression and sexual characteristics.

“This project aims to promote the equality, rights and needs of the LGBTQ community and to urge the general public to recognize the uniqueness and beauty of LGBTQ people.”

Student: Charice lai
Classes:
BA (Hons) Fashion Promotion and Imagery
E-mail:
[email protected]


Hong Kong Design Institute

Restoring Local “Landmarks” in Hong Kong by Alexander Lo

“This project involves revisiting and restoring some of the local landmarks in Hong Kong. Through a photographic journey, it captures previous traces and stimulates memories of the past 11 months.

“From peaceful rallies and assemblies to daring protests, they all started early in the meeting at famous buildings or landmarks like Jardine House, Chater Garden and Statue Square in the center or other neighborhoods.”

Student: Alexandre lo
Classes:
HD in Film, Television and Photography – Photography Stream
E-mail:
[email protected]


Content of the partnership

This school exhibition is a partnership between Dezeen and the Hong Kong Design Institute. Learn more about the content of the Dezeen partnership here.

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